Volume I, Number 6, Spring/Summer 2006

 

Animals as Artists

There was so much information gathered for this article that we had to create eight separate web pages, just to handle each section in a readable fashion. The following links will take you to each page:

. . . . . . . . . . . . Chimpanzees (Congo)

. . . . . . . . . . . . Gorillas (Koko)

. . . . . . . . . . . . Orangutans (Nonja)

. . . . . . . . . . . . Elephants (Ardila)

. . . . . . . . . . . . Cats

. . . . . . . . . . . . Birds

. . . . . . . . . . . . Dolphins

. . . . . . . . . . . . Turtles (Koopa)

After reading these articles you can easily see that one of the reasons that artists don't get paid is that there is competition from the animals, who have received far more press coverage, notoriety, and fame than most living visual artists. This shows a total lack of respect for the profession.

If you read some of the earlier entries of "Why Artists Don't Get Paid" featured in our Archives along with seeing the support for these animals, some of whom have created works that sold for tens of thousands of dollars, it just goes to show why those involved in determining what is art and what art should be featured in galleries and museums are not as qualified as those who produce the art itself. They are especially far less qualified than the professionals who create art for a living or the dedicated artists who have sacrificed everything to produce beauty.

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